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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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A quiet wedding recently occurred at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Maris when their daughter, Miss Rae became the bride of Mr. E. C. Hageman. The ceremony was performed by Reverend J. F. Dennis. After a bounteous wedding supper the couple went to Phillipsburg and from there to Aleman where they were spending the week with a sister of the groom. The bride has for a number of years had full charge of the dry goods, ready-to-wear and millinery departments of the big Maris Department Store, quickly developing into a very capable business woman and being the mainstay of her parents. Her acquaintance over the county is large and she is held in high esteem by many friends and admirers. The groom is a substantial businessman of large experience. For some months he has conducted with singular ability the grocery department of the establishment and on the eve of his union with the gracious daughter of the house, he becomes the owner of this department through purchase. After their short honeymoon, he will take possession of the grocery side, while Mrs. Hageman will continue as the manager of the other side, making a very happy arrangement. Everybody wishes for them a long and happy life under their new conjugal relationship.
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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Lloyd Clifton, 32 years old, was murdered by his father, J. T. Clifton, who fired five times at him with his revolver, three of the shots taking effect. Clifton and his son were living together on a farm in Graham County. At breakfast, the younger man asked to have some eggs cooked. His father returned, saying if they ate them now they would have to buy them later on. Lloyd then went to the henhouse to get some eggs. His father followed and opened fire with his revolver. Leaving his son writhing in his death agonies on the ground, the inhumane father reloaded his gun, put it in his pocket, returned to the house where he ate his breakfast and washed the dishes. Discovery of the crime was soon made and sheriff Carl Peterson and ex-sheriff W. F. Jones went out to arrest the old man. As he had a bad record as a fighter, Jones crept up behind and threw his arms around him, pinning his arms so he would not reach his gun. He said he never did so much bear hugging as this time. In his position, Peterson disarmed him. W. H. Clark, county attorney of Sheridan County, appeared as his attorney and asked for a commission to inquire as to Clifton’s sanity. This was granted and the report will be made later in October. Clifton was tried in 1910 or 1912 in Judge Smith’s court and sentenced to a term in the penitentiary for assault with attempt to kill, which he served.
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Further details of the accident in the mountains near Walla Walla, Washington, which caused the death of Dr. A. B Oechsli were given us by W. K. Skinner, who attended his funeral at Lawrence. Dr. Oechsli and one of the older medical officers at the hospital had started in a Buick car for a hunting lodge in the mountains, seventy miles distant, on a hunting trip of two days. When within fifteen miles of their destination, they turned into an abandoned road and did not discover their mistake until they had gone some distance. The road narrowed decidedly and when they reached a place with a deep declivity on one side, they were about to abandon the car owing to the difficulty of turning around, but finally made the attempt. The doctor remained in the car and the other man got out to push; he started the motor, which missed the gears and commenced to back, taking the former over the bluff and going on down into the gulf below. The man on foot fell about fifteen feet and was stunned, upon recovering his senses he saw the overturned car 150 feet below him and the lights still going. It was now dark and he clambered with much difficulty down over the rocks to the fallen car but could not find Dr. Oechsli. He then found another road at the bottom and walked six miles to a ranger’s cabin. They phoned to Walla Walla for help and with a lantern went back to search for Dr. Oechsli, finding him about midnight some distance up the slope. He was still alive, but unconscious. At 4:00 o’clock in the morning the ambulance with doctors and nurses came and the doctor was rushed back to the hospital. An x-ray examination showed no broken bones, but the skull at the base of the brain was fractured. He remained unconscious and died 48 hours after the accident.
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W. K. Skinner received a telegram from Mrs. A. B. Oechsli at Walla Walla, Washington that Dr. Oechsli was killed in an auto accident and that interment would occur at Lawrence, Kansas. This was painful news for the people of Stockton. Dr. Oechsli practiced medicine here for a number of years prior to the war. Dr. and Mrs. Oechsli came to Stockton in the spring of 1908. He had an extensive practice, and was accounted a physician of exceptional skill. Personally, he was a man of intelligence and refinement possessing traits that brought to him many warm friendships. His age was about 39. A. G. Muir, who had
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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A large number of the friends of Dr. Book and family assembled in the city park and had a delightful social affair under the trees. The long table was spread with good things. The approaching departure of this family whose life among us has for many years meant so much to the community, brings sadness to many hearts. The Books came to Stockton about 22 years ago during which time the doctor has faithfully ministered to ailments of thousands, old and young, being accounted one of the ablest and most successful physicians in the country, keeping always abreast of the times in the use of medicinal discoveries. He never wearied or fell short in his responsibilities to the care of suffering humanity and his name is a household word in countless homes.
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Another home has been desolated and a woman’s life cut short in full bloom of maturity by carelessness in the use of coal oil. The tragedy occurred to Mrs. Riley Wildix on a farm south of Dr. Book’s place. The fire in the kitchen range was down to a few glowing coals. To hurry it along in her preparation for dinner, she took the oil can in which there was about a gallon and poured some in the grate. Instantly there was a flash, which followed up the spout and the can exploded in her hands. Her clothes at once caught fire and she ran outside and wrapped herself in a mattress lying on the ground. Her husband was at the barn and ran to her assistance extinguishing the fire on her person, and putting out the fire in the house, which had not reached much headway. He carried her in and summoned Drs. Book and Richmond, who found the unfortunate lady had been burned over a large part of her body, especially in front. They knew at once it would be impossible to save her, as far more than 50 percent of the surface of her body was scorched. Had there been less than half affected, she might have stood a change of recovery. Twelve hours later past midnight, her life was extinct. The deceased was very highly prized, not only by her family and bereft companion, but by all her numerous acquaintances. She was a lady of the most loveable qualities, true to all the impulses of a noble nature. Everybody who knew her sings her praises and expresses the warmest sympathy for her devoted husband and family. During the hours after her accident she suffered little and talked freely of the accident, believing that she would recover.
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Greater than Watts, Morse, Edison, Bell or Marconi will be the mechanical genius who can bottle up this Kansas heat for use next winter! Mr. Burlin, secretary of the Fair Association, reports that the Salina Retailers Association intends to make a good fellowship tour in September and that their party, numbering about 100, will spend the afternoon and evening.
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The primary election was participated in by more people in Rooks County than in any former year, thereby fulfilling in a large degree the purpose of its creators. A. G. Schneider is nominated for representative by a majority of 32 votes. Ross Southard gets the nomination for county clerk over the present incumbent Mrs. Eades by 175 votes. Floyd Clayton is re-nominated for register of deeds by a majority of 251 over A. E. Hawk. Frank Phelps was the high man among the six candidates for sheriff, having a lead of 101 over his nearest competitor, Mr. Van Horn. Jim Lala of Ash Rock Township won the honors for commissioner in the first district. Mr. Van Dyke was second and Mr. Dougherty third. The contest among the Democrats was also for sheriff, and A.C. Gillilan got it by a safe margin.
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WHAT STOCKTONITES WERE DOING 98 YEARS AGO

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On Saturday afternoon another disastrous conflagration was suffered by Woodston by which the post office building, Woodman Hall, Murphy’s Restaurant and Wilson’s Produce House were all destroyed. The fire started in the kitchen of the restaurant, which was owned by Ernest Murphy. Mrs. Swank had done the cooking for the dinner and had gone out leaving Mr. Murphy in the front part. When he discovered the blaze, it was past his control. There was an opening of about fifteen feet between his building and the corner building on the west, occupied by the post office. This quickly caught and was soon in flames. The wind blowing from the south enabled the crowd that had gathered to remove nearly all the contents, including mails, fixtures, Woodman furniture and the player piano from above the restaurant. The total loss is probably in the neighborhood of $6,000.00, covered by partial insurance. This is the sixth fire Woodston has had within a year, all of them costly. The post office building was owned by Frank Shutts, whose mill was burned some months ago.