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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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M. Jepson, just east of town, harvested last week a pretty fair crop of oats from a field of 35 acres on which last fall he had sown wheat. Last year the field had produced oats and enough had rattled out to make a good even stand. In the fall Mr. Jepson sowed wheat, which because of dry weather, did not germinate, or rather the oats got there first and took the ground. The old scriptural phrase: “Whatsoever a man soweth that shall he also reap,” finds its exception in Kansas where the unexpected always happens.
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WHAT STOCKTONITES WERE DOING 98 YEARS AGO

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Last Saturday morning at two o’clock people living near the culvert bridge on east Main Street were aroused from their slumbers by a tremendous crash and then all was silent. In the morning a small Dixie flyer car badly demolished was astride the cement guard at the side of the roadway No mangled forms of victims were to be found in the neighborhood, nor did the owner of the car appear to tell how it happened and all sorts of speculations were made as to how it got there and how badly the driver was hurt. At ten o’clock Ralph Hickerson of Osborne, showed up and said it was his car. He had hit the side of the bridge in the dark and was thrown out in the ditch, but was not hurt. He got up, went to bed and had a good sleep before investigating as to the injuries of the car.
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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The funeral obsequies for Mr. John Shaw were held at the beautiful home on Second Street north and were attended by a large number of sorrowing friends who filled the house, the porches and the yard in front. The deceased by his upright and blameless life, his ready sympathy, and the gentle courtesy he maintained in all his relations to his fellowman made him a friend to everybody and a everybody his friend.
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WHAT STOCKTONITES WERE DOING 98 YEARS AGO

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Seldom has this community received such a shock as when the directful message came shortly before noon on June 1st that our honored citizen, M. J. Coolbaugh, had passed away suddenly at the Research hospital in Kansas City. He had left for an operation, but in full expectation that he would return within a month, recovered from the bladder trouble that had developed shortly before, and which was not considered by his physicians very serious. The immediate cause of this was not directly due to his trouble, though contributing in some measure to the collapse that came with such haste. There had been no operation yet on the morning of his demise, as he was sitting up and with great pleasure welcomed his son, Chas., who had just arrived from Stockton. A blood test was taken and while there he was suddenly stricken and in a very short time had ceased to breathe. A blood clot or hemorrhage near the heart had occurred. He had had an attack of flu some weeks ago, which greatly weakened him and he had recently had his teeth drawn. Morris Coolbaugh was a man of ready sympathy and kindly impulses toward all mankind, which he carried out in every relation, public or private, domestic or social. He was indeed part of the community of life, and his going is generally considered a calamity, for his hearty cooperation can no more be given. He was faithful and devoted in his religious life, a constant church and Sunday School attendant, and a supporter of all their activities. Mr. Coolbaugh was a member of the Stockton Congregational Church and a valued deacon at the time of his death at the age of 59 years, seven months and 25 days.
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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News of the death of this fine old gentleman caused sorrow among his many friends in this community. W.S. Bird was apparently in his usual health, when the summons came. He was driving a lot of chickens into the chicken yard and probably overexerted himself, causing a stoppage of the heart, and he died before he could be brought into the house. Bird, a Civil War veteran, began his earthly pilgrimage on April 23rd, 1846, which extended through a period of 76 years and six days.
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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It takes a long time to fill the big swimming pool, which takes on the appearance of a little lake as it widens out towards the top. The pump commenced Tuesday morning and is still going. Mr. Dryden hopes to have it filled to the top by Saturday. The pool holds 100,000 gallons. Water will be drawn off every evening and fresh water running in all the time. The dressings rooms are about completed. There are 18 of these rooms on each side of the corridor, besides shower baths and toilets. A seat for spectators extends clear around the pool. Most of the young people and many of the older ones already have their own bathing suits. For those not already provided, Mr. Dryden has 100 suits to rent. The swimming pool promises to be the most popular resort in Stockton during the summer.
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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One of the towns most respected citizens, Christopher Reed, died at his home in Stockton. He had been ill for about three weeks with a severe cold, and kidney complications caused the fatal termination. Christopher Reed died at 9:30 a.m. on May 17th, 1922 at the age of 76 years and 26 days. He grew to manhood in the place of his birth at Franklin, Wisconsin and lived there until 1878 when he came to Rooks County and homesteaded in Sugar Loaf Township where he lived until he moved to Stockton and purchased the residence which has since been his home. Just before coming to Rooks County, he married Miss Anna Cullen of Franklin, who died in April 1912. Four children were born to this union. He then married Miss Mary Frances McCarthy on November 9th, 1914. Mr. Reed was a man greatly respected by all who knew him. His sterling character and kindly impulses endeared him to neighbors as well as relatives, and the most profound sorrow is felt at his separation from earthly affairs that has occurred.
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WHAT STOCKTONITES WERE DOING 98 YEARS AGO

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Wanted: 200 boys and girls to join the Dandelion League. The Civic League is offering each week a prize of 50 cents to the member who digs the greatest number of pounds of dandelions, and a ticket to the picture show to the one who brings in the dandelion with the longest root. The dandelions are to be brought to the City Park at 8:00 o’clock on the Saturday of each week, beginning Saturday, May 13th. For further information inquire of Mrs. John Wells, chairman of the committee.
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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On April 23rd, Miss Zetta Roskilly and William Edward Buss, accompanied by Miss Lowe and Mr. Earl Buss, motored to Stockton where they were united in marriage by Judge Case. They then went to the beautiful country home of the groom’s parents where they were showered with the congratulations of admiring relatives and friends. All were then seated at long tables where a sumptuous wedding dinner was enjoyed after which the beautifully decorated bride’s cake was cut and served by the bride. Eddie Buss is the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Buss and has spent his entire life in Sugar Loaf Township. He is a farmer lad of sterling qualities. His bride is the second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Del Roskilly of Lanark Township and is one of Rooks County’s most successful teachers. The basement of the