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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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News of the death of this fine old gentleman caused sorrow among his many friends in this community. W.S. Bird was apparently in his usual health, when the summons came. He was driving a lot of chickens into the chicken yard and probably overexerted himself, causing a stoppage of the heart, and he died before he could be brought into the house. Bird, a Civil War veteran, began his earthly pilgrimage on April 23rd, 1846, which extended through a period of 76 years and six days.
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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It takes a long time to fill the big swimming pool, which takes on the appearance of a little lake as it widens out towards the top. The pump commenced Tuesday morning and is still going. Mr. Dryden hopes to have it filled to the top by Saturday. The pool holds 100,000 gallons. Water will be drawn off every evening and fresh water running in all the time. The dressings rooms are about completed. There are 18 of these rooms on each side of the corridor, besides shower baths and toilets. A seat for spectators extends clear around the pool. Most of the young people and many of the older ones already have their own bathing suits. For those not already provided, Mr. Dryden has 100 suits to rent. The swimming pool promises to be the most popular resort in Stockton during the summer.
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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One of the towns most respected citizens, Christopher Reed, died at his home in Stockton. He had been ill for about three weeks with a severe cold, and kidney complications caused the fatal termination. Christopher Reed died at 9:30 a.m. on May 17th, 1922 at the age of 76 years and 26 days. He grew to manhood in the place of his birth at Franklin, Wisconsin and lived there until 1878 when he came to Rooks County and homesteaded in Sugar Loaf Township where he lived until he moved to Stockton and purchased the residence which has since been his home. Just before coming to Rooks County, he married Miss Anna Cullen of Franklin, who died in April 1912. Four children were born to this union. He then married Miss Mary Frances McCarthy on November 9th, 1914. Mr. Reed was a man greatly respected by all who knew him. His sterling character and kindly impulses endeared him to neighbors as well as relatives, and the most profound sorrow is felt at his separation from earthly affairs that has occurred.
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WHAT STOCKTONITES WERE DOING 98 YEARS AGO

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Wanted: 200 boys and girls to join the Dandelion League. The Civic League is offering each week a prize of 50 cents to the member who digs the greatest number of pounds of dandelions, and a ticket to the picture show to the one who brings in the dandelion with the longest root. The dandelions are to be brought to the City Park at 8:00 o’clock on the Saturday of each week, beginning Saturday, May 13th. For further information inquire of Mrs. John Wells, chairman of the committee.
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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On April 23rd, Miss Zetta Roskilly and William Edward Buss, accompanied by Miss Lowe and Mr. Earl Buss, motored to Stockton where they were united in marriage by Judge Case. They then went to the beautiful country home of the groom’s parents where they were showered with the congratulations of admiring relatives and friends. All were then seated at long tables where a sumptuous wedding dinner was enjoyed after which the beautifully decorated bride’s cake was cut and served by the bride. Eddie Buss is the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Buss and has spent his entire life in Sugar Loaf Township. He is a farmer lad of sterling qualities. His bride is the second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Del Roskilly of Lanark Township and is one of Rooks County’s most successful teachers. The basement of the
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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On Tuesday evening two or three auto loads of young people started out to the Muir place north of town to serenade the newlyweds, Mr. and Mrs. George Muir. In the rear car were Ronald Cooper, Dorothy Stewart, Albert Hindman and Jessie Hammond. Ronald was driving. Near the schoolhouse south of Muir’s he turned out to avoid a mud hole and struck some rough ground when the radius rod broke. The car turned over and completely around facing the south. The occupants were thrown out and received various injuries. Hindman was knocked senseless for awhile, Miss Stewart was bruised and cut in many places over her body, but Ronald fared the worst for his right forearm was broken and crushed so that the bones protruded through the flesh. Frank Hus came along with his car and brought the victims to the Land & McMillen operating rooms. An x-ray of Cooper’s arm showed that he would need hospital care, and it was decided to take him to Concordia for treatment. At one o’clock in the night Dr. McMillen started with his patient, accompanied by Mrs. P. H. Cooper for that place. Mrs. Cooper returned the next day as the surgeons decided to wait some time before setting the bone which was broken in two places and badly splintered. At last report, Ronald was suffering considerably.
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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Pursuant to the time-honored custom, Stockton’s oldest ladies study club gave its annual banquet to which the husbands and friends of members were bidden. These occasions have been so attractive as feasts for the mind as well as the body that from the start they have always been important events in the social life of the community. The dinner was served in the basement of the Christian Church and pronounced perfect in every respect. Roast turkey and customary trimmings followed the consumme, with apple pie and frozen cream as the finale. The intellectual spread and music were equally enjoyable. Mrs. J. M. Wells, the president of the 20 Century Club made the introductions with original witticisms of laughter-provoking quality. H. C. Sweet gave a brief history of early Stockton. Mrs. May White spoke about “Our Ideals,” saying that Stockton was always a progressive town as she knew it years ago while living in Kirwin. Mrs. Florence Wallace sang “Why April Weeps,’’ her clear, well-modulated tones producing a fine effect. She responded to an encore with a musical gem, “Morning Glories.” Mrs. O. S. Ellvin gave an artistic rendition of Marguerite’s “Flower Song” from Faust in Swedish, which was enthusiastically received. Mrs. Vern Bloom accompanied both ladies on the piano. During the evening classic selections were rendered on the Victrola.
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WHAT STOCKTONITES WERE DOING 98 YEARS AGO

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A terrible tragedy occurred when Mr. and Mrs. Upton Douglas were driving to their country home. They had secured Frank Munn’s incubator at the George Crain place and were proceeding to the Dan Douglas place northwest of town in a lumber wagon drawn by a frisky team. Mrs. Minnie Douglas was seated on the incubator box until the railroad track east of town when the team became unmanageable and Mrs. Douglas, becoming frightened, got hold of the lines with her husband and started pulling with all her might. When they got past the Frank McManis house, the team was still running very fast. She told Upton she was afraid to stay on the wagon, and that her hands were tired so she let go of the reins. She told him she would get out before they got to the corner. Since her husband’s whole attention was given to guiding the horses, he does not know whether she fell out or jumped. The last he noted she was in the back of the wagon. The team sped on and did not make the turn but went straight ahead through the fence into a field before they finally stopped. Looking back he saw his wife lying in the road. He turned and drove back as quickly as possible. An auto from Woodston had come upon the scene and Mrs. Douglas was lifted into it and taken at once to Dr. Travis’s office. When lifted up she breathed once or twice, but was dead when the doctor’s office was reached. He found that her neck was broken and the top of her head was crushed. We linger today amidst the uncertainties of life and remember Mrs. Minnie Douglass who was active in life, radiant in hope, strong in courage, a helpful companion, a devoted mother, toiling and planning for the welfare of her home and children when without warning, answered the final call, joining the silent throng of the shadowland at the age of 34 years, ten months and fourteen days. “Her sun had gone down while it was yet day.”
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What Stocktonites Were Doing 98 Years Ago

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The contract for the new Stockton High School building was let onto Gordon Walker of Salina, Kansas. The new building is to cost approximately $90,000.00 when completed, leaving the District over $10,000.00 with which to purchase the equipment. Mr. Walker will be here next week to commence the work on our new building, which he expects to have ready for use by the first of October. The plumbing and heating contract was awarded to The Universal Plumbing Company of Stockton, and the electric contract went to Ramsey and King of Hutchinson.