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Anna Schremmer, K-State Research & Extension Family Consumer Science Agent for Phillips-Rooks District #5

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As a kid growing up, I was scared of fireworks. The firecrackers were too loud, the big booms made my ears hurt, I was afraid I would get burnt, but despite all of that, I loved watching the fireworks show put on at the Rooks County Fair Grounds after the car races. We would sit in our pasture on our pickup’s tailgate, at the top of the “big hill” overlooking Stockton and watch the fireworks display. Best seats in the house.

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Insight From Kansas Farm Bureau

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Wow, we blew right through spring and are bearing down on summer, and in the Farm Bureau world that means annual meeting time is right around the corner. Annual meetings are vital in the life of our organization and something many members look forward to. It is a time to conduct the business of our organization but also a time to fellowship with our neighbors and friends.
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Anna Schremmer, K-State Research & Extension Family Consumer Science Agent for Phillips-Rooks District #5

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“Thunder Makes the Noise but Lightning Does the W≠ork”, the song sung by Chad Brock speaks to the topic of today.  Thunder is loud and sometimes very scary, but other than rattling the house, it is not dangerous.  It’s the lightning that needs to be taken seriously as the “lightning does the work”.

Summer is the peak season for one of the nation’s deadliest weather phenomena, lightning.  But don’t be fooled, lightning strikes year round.  In the United States, an average of 58 people are killed and hundreds of people are permanently injured each year by lightning.

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Rachael Boyle, Phillips-Rooks District Extension Agent Agriculture and Natural Resources

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It is time to look for bagworms. Although the cool weather this spring will slow development and consequently larvae hatching from eggs, bagworm caterpillars will eventually be present feeding on broadleaf and evergreen trees and shrubs. Therefore, be prepared to act against bagworms once they are observed on plants. Bagworms are primarily a pest of conifers; however, they feed on a wide-range of host plants including a number of broadleaf plants, such as; rose, honey locust, hackberry, and flowering plum.