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Insight From Kansas Farm Bureau

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The Benefits of Cooperation Jackie Mundt, Pratt County farmer and rancher If I were putting together a Sunday Drive Edition of a scavenger hunt, it would most certainly include the “CO-OP” emblem. You probably know that one I mean: an outline of a red circle and blue circle overlapping and the letters C-O-O-P stamped in the middle.
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Rachael Boyle, Phillips-Rooks District Extension Agent Agriculture and Natural Resources

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Soldier Beetles Soldier beetles are quite common throughout Kansas and I’ve noticed them lately in my flowers and garden. They are most commonly noticed in late summer as the adults are highly mobile, relatively large, and are very active searching for and feeding on pollen.
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Rachael Boyle, Phillips-Rooks District Extension Agent Agriculture and Natural Resources

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Choosing the best cover crop for a particular cropping system can be difficult. Many factors are involved when selecting the most appropriate cover crop. The Midwest Cover Crops Council (MCCC) has released an improved cover crop selection tool to help farmers determine the best types of cover crops for their fields. The MCCC is made up of representatives from 12 Midwest states, the Canadian province of Ontario, and select universities, including Kansas and Kansas State University.
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Anna Schremmer, K-State Research & Extension Family Consumer Science Agent for Phillips-Rooks District #5

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This year I think I’m the only one that didn’t plant a garden. It wasn’t because I don’t like to garden; it’s because lots of people give me produce which is very much appreciated. Also when the garden is producing abundantly, that is my busiest time of year at work.
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Anna Schremmer, K-State Research & Extension Family Consumer Science Agent for Phillips-Rooks District #5

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Even though we think of severe storms in the spring in Kansas, storms occur all year long. Right now hurricanes are hitting our southern states but their affects can be felt in Kansas too. What about those winter blizzards that seem to pop up out of nowhere? Are you prepared? September is National Preparedness Month.
 

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Rachael Boyle, Phillips-Rooks District Extension Agent Agriculture and Natural Resources

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Harvesting Winter Squash Summer squash such as zucchini and scallops are harvested while immature but winter squash such as acorn, hubbard and butternut are harvested later, in the mature stage, after the rind is tough and seeds have developed. We normally think September is the time that winter squash are harvested.